Difficult conversations for a coach

Discussion in 'Training Tips & Coaching' started by Ernst, Jan 2, 2018.

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What are the most difficult conversations for a coach? (max 2)

This poll will close on Mar 27, 2018 at 4:27 PM.
  1. Dropping a player from your team because not good enough (anymore)

    64.3%
  2. Dropping a (star) player because not a good fit for the team

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Motivational talks with the eternal reserves from your team

    14.3%
  4. When your star player will not conform to team tactics

    28.6%
  5. When major youth talents do not put in the work needed to get them to the next level

    14.3%
  6. With parents or partners from your players with unrealistic expectations

    42.9%
  7. Other.... please elaborate in a reply below

    7.1%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Ernst

    Ernst FHF Starter

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    Just one of many topics we enjoyed during the keynote speech by legendary coach Ric Charlesworth at the first ever online Coach Conference dealt with the difficult conversations you need to have as a coach :


    What do you consider difficult conversations for a coach and would you deal with these?
     
  2. Krebsy

    Krebsy FHF All Time Great

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    For me it is undoubtedly the parents of young players.
    I have yet to meet a player who cannot take honest and open comment on board (unless there is a pushy parent/teacher behind the scenes) but i have had real struggles with parents and teachers who are convinced their chosen prodigy is a shoe-in for Maddie Hinch's job if only i could see this as clearly as they.
    Ah well. I am happy to be proven wrong. It just hasn't happened yet. At leasy 2 youngsters i have had the privilege of coaching have played for their national teams. I can't always be wrong.
     
  3. JE87

    JE87 FHF Regular Player

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    Stick/s:
    Ritual - various to suit my coaching needs!
    Other - When your captain/leadership group doesn't show the leadership qualities that are required (but there is no one else suitable for the role...).

    I don't necessarily find the conversations with parents difficult - it's the job of the coach to deal with this honestly. If the parent disagrees, they are entitled to their opinion, but that should be it. Annoying, yes. Not ideal, absolutely. Difficult, no.

    Most difficult is dropping a player who commits more than 100% but simply isn't good enough at that given time. It does depend on the goal/objective of the team, but selecting a team most likely to win in the short term over the long term throws up this problem more often than not.
     
    Craig Boyne and Grays Hockey like this.
  4. Peakey

    Peakey FHF Regular Player

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    I’ve only coached locally so I’ve never had to ‘drop’ anyone from a team or reject reserves, but worst conversation was definitely with parents after punishing a promising young player. As the ‘star’ of the team, she never listened to strategy, worked with the team or showed any sportsmanship. It was always everyone else’s fault if she wasn’t able to successfully run the whole field all by herself.

    She was a forward, so I put her as a sweeping fullback so she could see the game from a different perspective and to learn how important it is to use the team when you’re only job is to distribute the ball. Naturally the parents pulled me aside and went on a tirade about how they didn’t want to come to games only to see their superstar standing around on the field. I’m not a particularly aggressive bloke, so it was challenging to try and explain what was happening to two very nasty parents.
     

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