Half Court / Full court Press

Discussion in 'Training Tips & Coaching' started by hopper, Oct 7, 2007.

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    hopper FHF Newbie

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    Hi folks

    What is a Half Court / Full court press???
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    gk09 FHF Regular Player

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    A very simple answer is that the half court press is when you only put pressure on your opponents when they are in your half and the full court press is when you put pressure on them all over the pitch. Ask if you want more details than that though.
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    patpat

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    yea its what Gk09 said but i thought it was only a basketball thing hence the court.

    half court is when you lose the ball everyone legs it back and gets in a their position ready to defend and full court is when you put pressure on every player you can. for example putting pressure on the ball carrier but also marking any other player he could pass to.

    But again i thought it was just a bball thing
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    keely FHF Legend

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    It is a reference to basketball, where there are two main types of defence (sometimes the level of play dictates what can be used, i.e. young kids are not permitted to use a full-court press in some divisions and leagues but must fall back into half-court).

    As it applies in field hockey, my understanding is that a full-court press involves a defending team setting up an aggressive "circle" on, for example, a 15m hit by their opposition and go hard after the ball (possibly by double-teaming). Half-court is the complete opposite, where the defending team will literally put all 11 players behind the centre line even as the opposition takes a free hit from back at their own 15m. The idea is to compress the structure vertically and close out that space so that attempts to play the ball in between the forwards and mids results in a turnover. Teams faced with a half-court defence often try to hit the long ball through into the mass of players, which plays right into defending team's hands.

    I hope that helps.
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    Turtle

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    They are the two extremes of different types of press that you can use in a game. I have a couple of doco's on it if anyone wants let me know and I'll send them to you, they are a bit big to put on here.

    Also called Stand-off or Fall away Press.

    A number of International teams use the Half Court press to about 60 - 75%, so not a half court press somewhere in between.

    The whole idea really is to compress your defense and make it harder to enter that zone, give the opposition possesion in their own half. You can also use it to trap the opposition in a certain part of the field, using a combination of half court press and a rushing defence, e.g. to trap them on their left side, your forestick side, by putting pressure on the passes back accross when the ball has been moved into your zone.

    If you want more info let me know and I'll send it to you.
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    Paul Watts FHF Legend

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    Hey Turtle, Please send me docos on pressing, my email is in my profile. Cheers mate :)
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    bucket

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    Wassie FHF Legend

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    In my view, full court press is pressuring the opposition in their defensive quarter/third of the field to get a turnover and attack the goal quickly. Half court press involves setting up your defence in the midfield (ie middle third) and drawing the opposition out of their defensive structure so that you can quickly turn them around and counter attack.
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    Paul Watts FHF Legend

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    Cheers Turtle :)
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    Mo79 FHF Staff

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    Statistically the top mens sides use a halfcourt to 3/4 court press.The Spanish men tend too take more risks than the germans,aussies & dutch to win possession.You can press anywhere as long as your capacity to manage the risk outweighs the opposing teams ability to counter attack effectively.

    I recently coached in a tournament where teams were playing the half court press.The problem was there was little evidence to suggest they knew when to ambush ie to step towards a full press of some shape.
    The result: We kept 80% of possession,made them shuffle from side to side,it was a bit like watching England field in the last two days on the test vs SAfrica recently.
    Other consequence: We played the patience game better and when we did concede,they didnt have the legs to mount a serious counter.

    What am I saying?
    * This system is quite complex and requires more than a boardtalk.
    * You can only chase ball for so long and then must change to an ambush or step up on some level
    * Requires highly developed transition skills ie that is efficient movement(players & ball) post turnover
    NB: You also need forwards with speed,advanced elimination and goalscoring skills
    * Conserve energy by incorporating an element of zonal marking in the mid/half line(which ever is most appropriate in the circumstances)

    Beijing:
    The conditions will be a factor so expect plenty half court movement.
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    keely FHF Legend

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    Great insights, Mo79. I know you're involved on the men's side of the game but do you think the same half-court tactics will be common on the women's side? Who is most likely to use it, and who is going to be most successful?
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    Grumpy FHF Legend

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    Patpat, you should know if you have watched your club or school i know as they both use half court, 3/4 court and full press.
    :eek:
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    Grumpy FHF Legend

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    Most teams have been caught out by playing a full court press and a 70 metre aerial has gone from left back to right wing, or a 30 metre aerial goes across the back line thus taking out 6-7 players with one pass.
    Half court actually saves the legs of the players and in my experience is played in warmer climates. But others could have different experienced things differently. I normally have to change the front 2 or three.
    The full press is very energy intensive and now i only use it coming up to half time, just after scoring or just after the opposition have scored.
    It is difficult to sustain for a whole match.

    All these need practice and i try and get my teams to knowwhen to use each one without me having to call it and that the areas in which we 'go for the ball' changes many times in a match. So each style of play probably has 3 different aspects to it.

    Love half court have played complete tournaments and won using it. Bores the pants off the opposition and the crowd but the records only record results and not how you got that result.
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    keely FHF Legend

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    What kinds of factors do into your decision-making (and that of your players) when you switch to a full-court press? Is it personnel (i.e. a particularly weak player receives the ball on the opposition), or a particular location on the pitch (deep left corner), or a particular spacing or formation issue that the opposition has gotten themselves into (i.e. due to ball movement and lack of work, the player in possession is isolated or maybe has only difficult to execute passing options)?
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    Grumpy FHF Legend

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    Miss control with the player facing the corner when trying to regain control of the ball, poor pass ( bobbling ), certain time of the game Just scored, just lost a goal. If their key player in a position is off the pitch. Injured player with a good aerial injured or resting.
    Last 5 in a half, want the ball as far from my goal as possibe.
    Umpire having a bad day get the ball away from them or to increase the pressure on them.
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    keely FHF Legend

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    That's really helpful, Grumpy. I need to be able to anticipate these kinds of changes in tactics and it will improve my understanding of what the teams are trying to accomplish, help me anticipate the general movement of play and understand and be proactive about management issues. I've been getting a lot of coaching lately about being more aware of the time in the match (as you say, 5 min. to go) and personnel changes that change who key players are and how the team will try to compensate or their opposition exploit their presence. Thanks!

    If anyone has more to offer on this, I'm/we're all ears.
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    Mo79 FHF Staff

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    When to trigger full press:
    examples
    1. mistrap
    2. lack of pre-scan by intended receiver
    3. intended receiver facing square(body position & eyes)
    4. pre-identified areas ie typically when splitting centre halves & pass had been made to left half
    5. coaches tend to just read the game;when your either up and playing with confidence or the opposition are not moving the ball with confidence.

    Response:
    1. A half court = energy saving if you use it zonally
    or man to man (against teams that do not rotate vertically & horizontally) ie narrow forwards & midfield concept
    ***Make no mistake you still run in a half court.Play Germans,they don't mind keeping the ball for 5minutes and watching you run from side to side
    2.Teams that throw those overheads seldom retain possession ie they have merely forced you back into your half-obviously if there is a real threat you retreat
    3. The system is become more about having plenty space to work with post-turnover than merely a defensive ploy.
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    Wassie FHF Legend

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    Keely, I think you might get a good idea of when the employ the full press by observing ice hockey tactics. Also, lacrosse is another sport that employs a full court press often. The examples of when to employ the full court press already given rely upon taking advantage of some mistake or error or vulnerable position the opposition has gotten themselves in to. I would like to think there is room for the offensive team to be proactive by making personnel changes, bringing on players that are more able to employ the full court press. I think ice hockey and lacrosse do this well.
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    keely FHF Legend

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    Thanks Mo79 for your examples, that helps a great deal. I found this very interesting too:

    So you're shifting the focus of the purpose of the tactic from what you want to happen in the backfield (congested spaces = turnover) to what you're trying to set up in the way of counter-attack. Cool. :)
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    Mo79 FHF Staff

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    Pretty much.

    I believe in cross pollination,so I watch football.Its a sport I love and probably the only reason i was able to start hockey in the first place.

    If you want to watch classic zonal,half court press at its best; watch Seria A.
    If you want to watch great counterattack football;watch the top premier league sides.

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