Indoor Hockey Drills 1vs1

Discussion in 'Indoor' started by TimmyNeutron, Oct 8, 2017.

  1. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Hello Guys

    We started a different approach for our upcoming indoor season in Germany.
    Since we always struggle to find a trainer which is not playing in the meantime (since I suppose it's everywhere in lower leves) we started to create a collection of drills and a complete practice schedule for the whole season and every session gets planned by one of 3 players out of a practice pool and he administers them in practice later.

    So my practice session has the focus on 1vs1 offensive in indoor hockey.
    The warm up routines and the end routines are already planned and I have the time open
    for 3x 10minutes drills for 1vs1 in the best case depending on each other and getting more difficult but being so different it doesnt get boring.
    I tried to look up some ressources here in the forum and on the Internet but I'm still swimming kinda.
    Just wanted to see if there are some more experienced coaches here in the forum which can help out with some rough Ideas or some ressources where I can look up 1vs1 drills for the offensive. Really appreciate possible Ideas and help.

    Cheers Tim
     
  2. JE87

    JE87 FHF Regular Player

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    You can do a rotational "piggy in the middle" exercise - create 2 wide channels, 4 defenders (1 defender per quarter of the court). If the defender wins the ball, attacker replaces the defender, and the defender attacks the next defender. After 2x 1v1 on one side, shoot at goal. Then join the queue for the same going the other way. Also change the direction so the attackers play on the left side and shoot from there also. Maybe the picture helps describe better than what I have said already...

    IMG_6566.JPG
    [​IMG]
     
    TheThinkingCoach and Mick Mason like this.
  3. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Hi JE87

    Thank's alot for that one! I really like that and will definitely put it to use.
    Can you give me feedback on what to watch when correcting players, my general ideas for the mindset in 1vs1 indoor is
    1. -big wide pulls with the ball to the other side
    2. -trying to go over the backhand side from the defender
    3. -trying to covert where you will go (dont look where you wanna go direclty, try to bodyfake etc.)

    Thank you for that drill already, definitely a fun and nice one.

    Cheers Tim
     
  4. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    4. -getting off the boards to give yourself two ways around the tackler, and so you open them up for a rebound. A simple rule we drum into juniors, but applies at all levels, when you are next to the board the board is another tackler- when you get off them they become part of your team.
     
  5. JE87

    JE87 FHF Regular Player

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    Where possible look for the attackers to open up the defender's left foot - or at least get the defender to commit to one side with their stick so that the attacker has space to play into on the opposite side. And the closer the attacker gets to a defender, the more the attacker should think about getting their body between defender and ball, ideally when driving past the defender. But always good for players to feedback to each other, what works and what doesn't etc.
     
  6. JE87

    JE87 FHF Regular Player

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    Yes - but to a point. Good defenders will allow you to play a ball off the board if it's a 1v1 situation - usually as long as it's not a pass to another player - as it's further away from a direct line to goal. So dropping the ball onto the board and then chasing it around the back of the defender gives a good defender the option to turn and intercept the ball off the board (as his feet and body position will be in a position to do so), or worst case gets his body between the attacker and the ball making it difficult to retrieve (and maybe giving a foul away...).

    This can work if the defender gets square on and doesn't move their feet, but the higher the level, the less likely this is. Better when you can bring him as far off the board as possible so there is enough space to carry the ball through there with less risk of making the ball available for the defender to try and win it.
     
  7. TimmyNeutron

    TimmyNeutron FHF Newbie

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    Hi Guys,

    Thank's alot to both of you in terms of feedback and suggestions.
    Playing hockey for quite some time now but never coached and just realised how hard it is to nail down the little things which happen most of the time automatically without thinking about it and phrasing that for somebody else to learn.

    JE87 what do you mean with "open" up his left foot ? I'm German so sometimes I may missinterpret some usual english sayings.
    Make him do a sidewarts movement to his left side so he places his food open/sidewards and is not able to get in a backwards motion quickly ?

    Cheers Tim
     
  8. JE87

    JE87 FHF Regular Player

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    Laziness from me, sorry! I coach in Germany but my players have got used to how I say things.

    I refer to the space outside the left foot - so carrying the ball to open up the left foot space.
     

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