Scoring and Offensive Play

Discussion in 'Training Tips & Coaching' started by CoachingInMotion, Oct 17, 2017.

  1. CoachingInMotion

    CoachingInMotion FHF Newbie

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    Hi all

    I’m wondering what you, as coach, try to instil in your strikers? And how do you want you offensive of the circle to be done?

    I’ve been reinforcing the ‘shoot as soon as you enter circle’ with others being ready for deflection, rebounds and possibility of PC.

    It’s worked well so far - 7 goals in 4 games. However some (midfield and a misfiring forward) players are not taking note and told some to strictly not shoot until it’s passed around in circle.

    I’m so confused but as coach I’m getting more and more frustrated with the lack of respect for 1)my coaching philosophy and 2) rest of the team / forwards
     
  2. Nij

    Nij FHF All Time Great

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    I think you need to account for the skill level and the fitness. No point telling them to shoot from the edge if they're always entering baseline left wing and can't tomahawk even from the spot, or to expect rebound and deflection when nobody runs to support the ball carrier.

    You need to set sensible guidelines for when to shoot, not just rules for it.

    If you have juniors for example, it makes no sense to attempt reverse shots from the left wing. Instead you would say that left looks for passing, top looks for goal, right looks for rebounds and deflections. That way you're basing your expectations of action on their expectations of skill and knowledge (they do what is sensible and possible, and you expect them to do sensible things, so what they try to do is what you expect and what you expect is what they'll try to do).

    At senior levels you can expect more capability, so shots for goal can come from wider, while you can enforce the search for deflection from more of the remaining D, and very little of the angle is excluded for passing only. Eventually you get to the point where every point is a potential rebound or deflection, and almost all of it is good for a proper shot at goal. By that stage you've got players who also have the ability to run ten metres of baseline and lay back to spot, or five metres baseline and cross or lay back to top.

    It's not enough to have a coaching philosophy of ideals. You need it to be based on what the players in this team can or could do, not just what you want them to do, and you must change it if the team is not capable of some particular expectation.

    For the same reason that you wouldn't play a 2-3-2-3 when you have no good countering forwards, or a 4-4-2 when your entire team is fit fast strikers and distribution midfielders, don't expect shots when you haven't got shooters or deflection when you haven't got supportive attackers.
     
  3. CoachingInMotion

    CoachingInMotion FHF Newbie

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    Completely understand what you’re saying.

    My players are senior level, with 2 of the 3 strikers well experienced and skilled enough to what I’m expecting.

    The third striker is left wing which I think I’ll alter upon your suggestions - passing for scoring opportunity. However she’s looking the ball passed to her from our CF and RW even though their instincts are to shoot. She’s basically been telling one of our forwards not to score and pass it instead - my hunch is that it’s jealousy because one of my forwards has not only scored 7 goals in 4 matches but has also set up the other 3 goals we have scored as a team. So obviously what we are doing is working. (We’ve scored 10 in 4 not 7 as in original post - it’s 7 for one striker).

    My philosophy is based on what I know they can do and what I have seen them do. My shoot as soon as entering circle principle is based on my strikers ability to shoot and has worked to date bar the one player who is too weak to be playing in that position and is something I will need to look at.

    I guess I feel a bit disrespected as a coach when I have a midfielder texting me after the match telling me what we need to work on (after a 4-0 win might I add). How would you deal with something like that?
     
  4. Nij

    Nij FHF All Time Great

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    Depends. Are they right?
    Winning 4-0 doesn't mean it was a great performance, just as losing 4-0 doesn't mean it was terrible. The forwards having a great day might cover up the midfielders having a terrible day.
    You would have to talk with your player to understand why they're saying what they say, because it reflects on what they're thinking. It could just be unhappiness that is all on them, maybe it points out small areas that you can adjust within the big picture.

    Same with the individual undermining what appears to be a functioning forward unit. Talk to them about why. Not because you want to judge-jury-execute them, but because you have a problem that must be solved, and that solution has to involve them somehow. It might also be a good idea to briefly check in with all your players, who might be hiding an issue as long as you keep winning but would let loose if the games don't go their way.
     
    Mick Mason likes this.
  5. Mick Mason

    Mick Mason FHF Top Player

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    My players are individuals, each with their own quirks and set of skills, and each with instructions on how I would "like" to see them play. What I want from the forwards can change depending on the opp' GK too. If the GK deflects out into play often enough I want the players to shoot early, help side IF/wide attacking mid should be waiting for the ball to pop out to them and they get a nice wide target. If the opp' GK deflects along the baseline a lot I will want the forwards to draw the GK and pass around. The important thing is that they be imaginative and try to be in the right position to allow options, the opp' soon picking up on what is going on if you do the same thing every time (and we play in a relatively small comp so the players know each other well).

    As far as the text thing, bring it on. Engagement from your players is half the battle won, now you have to work at using it to your advantage. Have good solid reasons for why you want a particular style of play, not just "it seems like a good idea" but solid reasoning (based on the skills of your team and the opp') that you can use to sell the plan to the players. Have a discussion after games and before training about people bringing new ideas to the teams play and discuss those ideas (the pluses and the minuses) and how your roster might be able to implement them. Have some training ideas to work the new plans into your games and be prepared to be honest with the players if they are reaching too far. Talk about the chances of the new ideas holding up against other teams in your comp, and if the new ideas are just a step too far then dial them back so you are using the idea but modified enough that it is achievable by your players. Above all, be honest and open, and be clear that unity of purpose on game day is important and so only you will decide the strategy for the game.
     

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